You've been sent here because you NEED it!
Want to be taken seriously? Read on!

Need to let someone know they're a failure on your forum?
Paste the text below in your post to let people know they've been schooled by you!
    

  

QUICK LINKS
Commas | Quotation Marks | Colons | Semicolons | Apostrophes | To, Two, and Too | There, Their, and They're




USEFUL GRAMMAR

Punctuation is the use of special marks to make writing more clear. Its important to proofread our writing to make sure that weve included all the proper punctuation.


Commonly Used and Misused Punctuation Marks

 

 Comma (,)

Use commas to separate items in a series. 

Example: Our itinerary included Delhi, Bombay & Nepal.

 

Use a comma before and, but, or, nor, for, so, and yet.

Example: The story gets off to a boring start, but it was exciting toward the end.

 

Use commas to set off nonessential clauses and phrases.

Example: My father, who was a genius, wrote this book.

 

Use a comma after introductory elements.

Examples: Well, how are you today? 

 

Use commas to set off an expression that interrupts a sentence.

Examples: This useful article, in our monthly magazine, is about child care. 

 

Use a comma in certain conventional situations (to separate items in dates and addresses, after the salutation and closing of a letter, and after a name followed by a title).

Examples: September 1, 1970  Mr. Robert, Ph.D.

 

Use commas after words like yes, no and well when they begin a sentence. 

Example: "Yes, I wrote this article."

 

Use commas to set off the names of people who are spoken to directly. 

Example: "Bob, that was a good lecture!"

 

Use commas to separate a series of three or more words. 

Example: "She made a sandwich with peanut butter, jelly, and bread."

 

Do not use unnecessary commas. Use them sparingly and only to clarify issues. Commas in the wrong places can be confusing and dangerous.

 

Example-1: Hang him, not release him. ----- This can get somebody hanged.

Example-2: Hang him not, release him. ----- This can get somebody released.



Quotation Marks (" ") 

Quotation marks come at the beginning and end of a person's exact words.

PERSON A: "Are you planning to change anything?"

PERSON B: "I want to change this design."

PERSON A: "What do you have in mind?"

PERSON B: "I want to decrease the tube length in the engine."

PERSON A: "It will not work."

End punctuation marks are usually placed inside the last quotation mark

Example:

Tom said, "He walked very quickly."

"Attention buyers. My book is in Amazon!"


Colon (:)

Use a colon to mean "note what follows."

Example: When you go to training, take these items: paper, pencil, and plenty of paper.


Semicolon (;)

Use a semicolon between independent clauses not joined by and, but, nor, for, yet, and so.

Examples:

Read what you've written; don't just pass it on.

Tom failed the exam; however, he did not drop the course.



Apostrophe (')

To form the possessive case of a singular noun, add an apostrophe and an s.

Examples: Tim's car; One's home. If the addition of an "s" produces an awkward sound, add only the apostrophe. Usually, this is when there is already a double "s" sound. Examples: Moses'; for old times' sake; for goodness' sake.

To form the possessive case of a plural noun, add an apostrophe after the s.

Example: girls' teams.

If the plural form of the word does not end in s, add an apostrophe and an s.

Example: women's team.

Use an apostrophe to show where letters have been omitted in a contraction.

Examples:

can't = cannot

it's = it is

Related - To, Too, and Two

When referring to the number '2', always use "TWO".

Examples: Women have two breasts.

When referring to a direction, action, or a destination, use "TO".

Example: He's going to the car.

When used in a sentance that means "also" or "very" you should use "Too".

Example: I want to go too! or That's too hard!.
A simple trick is to ask yourself "Can I use "also" or "very" in place of this?". In the example, does "That's very hard!" make sense? Of course it does! In that case "TOO" would be correct.

Related - There, They're, and Their

When referring to a PLACE, always use "THERE".

Examples: He lives over there.
An easy trick is "is it HERE or T-HERE". Adding a T to "here" makes it "there", both being a place.

When referring to a person's stuff, use "Their".

Example: All of their friends are cool.
Using their lets the reader know you're meaning something that belongs to someone else. Their home, their skateboard, etc.

When referring to a person's STATE OF BEING you should use "They're".

Example: They're going to church.
A simple trick is to ask yourself, "Can I use "they are" in place of this?". In the example, does "They are going to church." make sense? Of course it does! In that case "they're" would be correct.


Now you're prepared to post like a pro! Go get em tiger!

Need to let someone know they're a failure on your forum?
Paste the text below in your post to let people know they've been schooled by you!

 

Think you need help in other areas? Click here